Milo Lines Blog

Strike Your Irons Like TOMMY FLEETWOOD (Windmill Drill For Body Driven Swing)

Henry Fall:
All right. In this video, we’re going to show you how to strike your irons like Tommy Fleetwood with this wide-to-wide golf drill. Stick around.

Milo Lines:
Hey, Henry. I don’t know if you’ve seen, but there was a video that was going around on Instagram and a few other places of Tommy Fleetwood talking about this drill he did, where he was basically making the club go back and through without much hinge in his arms or elbows and mostly pivot. He called it a windmill drill.

Tommy Fleetwood:
We did a lot of straight arm swings where I had to turn my body. There was a lot of windmill swings going on. All of them, basically what we did was there was no hands and no wrist involved. It was all body and all connection.

Milo Lines:
You’ve seen that?

Henry Fall:
I have seen it. I have. Yes.

Milo Lines:
What do you think he was working on there?

Henry Fall:
It’s one of your foundation pieces from our online academy?

Milo Lines:
It is. It’s foundation number one for those who are members. If you’re not a member, come on over and you’ll find out.

Henry Fall:
But no, in all seriousness, he was talking about this connection that he wanted between his arms and his torso working together. Right?

Milo Lines:
Yes.

Henry Fall:
And feeling like the swing was derived more from his core and pivot and rotation versus what’s going on with all this stuff. Right?

Milo Lines:
Exactly. The whole idea of the drill is to get the pivoting motion to send the arms in the club unit in the proper arc. Because for most of us, our pivot actually throws the club out of the arc we want the club in, and then we’re trying to figure out how to salvage it the rest of the way, right?

Henry Fall:
Right.

Milo Lines:
So this drill is one that Tommy used to build his golf swing.

Henry Fall:
Yeah. He even talks about the sawed-off finish. That was a result of him making these practice swings, right?

Milo Lines:
Yes.

Henry Fall:
He found out that from here on, he really didn’t gain any energy per se. I’m sure if he went all out at something, he might wrap around a little bit more, but he finishes like that.

Milo Lines:
Yeah. His swing is a boom, and then it comes to a stop right there.

Henry Fall:
Right. There’s other guys throughout history that kind of swung … had some similarities. You think of Steve Stricker, not a lot of moving parts. It was very derived from the pivot. Even Jason Day, to some extent, especially with the shorter clubs, very pivot-driven. Much like this.

Milo Lines:
For sure. Creates a very stable face, not a lot of rotation in it.

Henry Fall:
The other thing is, it produces some width. This is something we talk about a lot is this width throughout the swing, not just arms extended into the finish.

Milo Lines:
Yeah, width is a stabilizing factor. So the wider the arc, the more stable this end gets to be.

Henry Fall:
For you guys at home that have that chicken wing finish, you’re going to want to stick around to see how this all works. Right?

Milo Lines:
For sure.

Henry Fall:
Okay, so I brought a towel out as well. Now, this isn’t a drill we necessarily use all the time.

Milo Lines:
No, but it’s a good drill to get people to feel how to tie their arms to their body swing. Let me do the towel drill first here. Let’s put the towel under each arm. If I was doing this drill, I’m just going to hit some windmill style like Tommy Fleetwood, where I’m just back and through. My club and my arms are moving basically perfectly in sync with my body right there.

Henry Fall:
Right. It’s almost like if I had a stick and I had it attached to your sternum and it attached to that club face. That width, that stick is basically in the same spot the whole way through with sternum turning through it. Right?

Milo Lines:
Yeah. For this drill, that’s perfect. That’s a really good way to play short game shots. Now, can you hit it very far with just this? No, but it’s a good foundation. Then as we continue on, now we’re going to start to let our arms swing a little bit. We’re going to create a little folding of the right arm and a little hinging of the right wrist. That’s about the time where I would take the towel out because I actually like a little bit of separation. I like this arm to have a little freedom. If I was going to throw something hard, my arm wouldn’t stay like this. But for these small swings, this is a really good way to train people how to keep their arms in sync with their body.

Henry Fall:
And to really produce a pivot-driven motion.

Milo Lines:
For sure.

Henry Fall:
Right? Because a lot of people struggle with creating that pivot. Their first instinct is to control the swing with their hands and arms. So if we can get that club traveling through space with the pivot a little bit better, your arc becomes a little bit better as well.

Milo Lines:
Totally. Now I’m going to take the towel away. I’ve demonstrated with the towel. So now what would this look like when we take the towel out?

Henry Fall:
I would tell you for this shot, I’d still wouldn’t want you to hit it very far.

Milo Lines:
So it’s going to be just a nice little clipper like that?

Henry Fall:
Sure. Now obviously, Fleetwood probably built this up and now it’s more his swing. But keep in mind, now he’s adding extension of the wrist-

Milo Lines:
Oh yeah, his right arm doesn’t stay straight.

Henry Fall:
Exactly.

Milo Lines:
It folds a little bit, and his wrists hinge so he gets a normal backswing. But he’s keeping that arc nice and wide. So it’s going to look more and more like that as we grow it.

Henry Fall:
Again, the key factor that he builds up is that pivot. So even from a short little swing like this to a fuller swing like that, the driving force is in here. Right?

Milo Lines:
Totally.

Henry Fall:
Because if we’re just throwing our hands and arms on it, you’re going to start getting a chicken wing or crazy things like that, right?

Milo Lines:
Yeah. A lot of times the chicken wing happens because you’re putting too much force into the golf club with your hands too early. We really don’t want to put the force into the club with our hands. We want to let the momentum of the club sling the golf club, is what I like to say. So my body’s turning, and those levers unwind because of physics, which is what Tommy does really well. But he does it with a really structured motion.

Henry Fall:
Awesome. As far as the held-off finish, what are your thoughts on that?

Milo Lines:
I actually use that kind of a shot for my flighted shots. It’s basically like he’s flighting it around the golf course more than he is trying to rip it. You don’t have to hit every shot as full as you can. So I don’t mind it. I probably wouldn’t do it with my driver, and he kind of does. But he’s good. Makes a lot more money than I do.

Milo Lines:
So I got to try to hit one more like Tommy. Strong ball flight. Tommy’s draws.

Henry Fall:
Oh, maybe the wind got it.

Milo Lines:
I don’t know.

Henry Fall:
All right, guys. Well, we hope you enjoyed it. Try out these little pivot drills, arms extended. That’s a nice little thing to build your swing around as you build up the speed and stuff. Right?

Milo Lines:
Yep. I hope you enjoyed this video. Please leave a comment below with any questions, thoughts, or future video ideas, as we read every comment and we try to respond to each of you.

Milo Lines:
If you would like further help with your game, head over to milolinesgolf.com, my website, and you can schedule lessons with myself or a member of my team. You can also join our academy, where you can get one-on-one coaching. We have members of our academy all over the world, and we’re excited to work with you no matter where you’re at.

Milo Lines:
If you’re new to our channel, don’t forget to click that subscribe button because we come out with new videos weekly. Thanks for watching.