Milo Lines Blog

Stop Getting Your Arms Stuck in the Golf Swing

Transcription

Milo Lines:
Welcome back out to Superstition Mountain. Last week I did a really good video, and I know a lot of you guys really liked it, about lead arm abduction, A-B duction, where the arm actually comes off the chest. I had a lot of questions on this topic about how that arm comes off the chest if I’m turning, people thought if you’re turning, wouldn’t the arm just stay connected? Now I’m going to show you what the dynamics are that actually allow that arm to come off so you can accelerate your hands more, and in turn accelerate the club more.

Milo Lines:
So I’ve got Henry Fall out here with me, Henry is part of Milo Lines Golf now, and he’s going to be helping me a lot with the site, and he’s actually a really good player as well, and a really good coach. So let’s talk through this a little bit, Henry. So we know from looking at gears, the best players, in transition their lead arm abducts, which means it goes more across their chest, but then from about the time their hands reach this position through the golf ball, their arm is moving off their chest.

Henry Fall:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Milo Lines:
And their body is still rotating. How is that possible? What’s one of the keys, or what is the real key that allows that to be able to happen?

Henry Fall:
Well, if you think of your right arm here, eventually you need to make room for this right arm to travel. So if my left arm is on my chest, I got no room.

Milo Lines:
Exactly. So your right arm, how does it function in a golf swing?

Henry Fall:
It’s much like skipping a rock, or-

Milo Lines:
Somewhat like throwing. It doesn’t really go as external as throwing does, but it’s somewhat in that manner. The real difference, there’s two arms, so it’s not going to go as external as a throw,

Henry Fall:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Milo Lines:
But the right arm is definitely moving like I’m going to throw this way. So if I was going to throw it at the camera, my right arm would work like this. Now if I connected my left hand, you could see, that’s not touching anymore.

Henry Fall:
Yeah, why don’t you turn for the… so do that same motion you just did.

Milo Lines:
I’m going to throw a ball like this, now I put my left arm on and you can see that there’s space there.

Henry Fall:
Now put your right hand back where that left hand was, now let’s get your left arm pinned against your chest. So what does this look, this looks like the most stuck position I’ve ever seen. So he has no room to operate.

Milo Lines:
Yeah, so if you’re not getting your left arm off your chest, the culprit is probably your right arm. What’s probably happening is in transition your body’s turning, and your right arm is staying back.

Henry Fall:
Yep.

Milo Lines:
Okay. So now this will be the next question everybody has, how do we fix it? If you’re doing that, what do we do to stop it? Well, there’s lots of things we can do. One really good thing you can do is hit some shots with a ball between your arms, because if my arm falls back and there’s a ball between my arms, the balls on the ground now.

Henry Fall:
Yeah.

Milo Lines:
So I’m going to have to figure out how to move this unit together, and that’s going to create that A-B duction that I’m looking for.

Henry Fall:
Right. One of Ben Hogan’s big things is where that right arm traveled, and he used to put a belt around his arms.

Milo Lines:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Henry Fall:
Now it’s a little opposite of the ball because the ball you have to hold, whereas the belt you’re almost pushing out.

Milo Lines:
Yeah, no, in reality, most really good players at impact, their lead arm is not straight.

Henry Fall:
Yeah.

Milo Lines:
So this would be an exaggeration, keeping it like that. In reality, this arm is actually pretty, there’s a lot of slack in it.

Henry Fall:
Yeah.

Milo Lines:
And because there’s slack in it, when I go to turn, you can see that turns that into a bow.

Henry Fall:
That speaks to the flow you often bring up in these videos.

Milo Lines:
For sure. Everything’s a flowing motion, and because this arm is actually not tense, not pushing it out, it’s soft. So when I get to impact, this arm looks like this and this arm looks like this, and I call it the home plate look. At impact, most really good players have this home plate look.

Henry Fall:
So if I’m at home and I’m doing this adduction feel where the left arm stays up to start the downswing, what would be the next step for me? If I’m here, I’ve got this left arm feeling up and on my chest, it’s got to still come off, right?

Milo Lines:
The next step is your body just keeps unwinding, but because you’ve loaded this lat.

Henry Fall:
Yeah.

Milo Lines:
And your right arm is functioning correctly, now this is going to sling off of you naturally, just like it does there. So do that same thing facing the camera so everybody can see what happened there. So at adduct, now because it’s all loaded, you can see how loaded up this all is, now it’s naturally going to start to sling off and you can see here, there’s a window. And that’s what most of the best players look like.

Henry Fall:
And this doesn’t go down the line, it goes back around it.

Milo Lines:
It goes back around.

Henry Fall:
Gotcha.

Milo Lines:
So your chest is turning, and your arms are swinging, it’s not all connected. So we’re not swinging connected like this.

Henry Fall:
Yeah.

Milo Lines:
These are free, these are independently operating contraptions that we’re slinging around ourselves, and that’s how it’s done. So it’s all your arms are independent, your right arm is functioning and it’s creating this look in the left arm.

Milo Lines:
So if you liked this video, please like and subscribe to my channel, and hit the notification bell so you get notified every time a new video comes out. Also, I’d love to have you as a member of MiloLinesGolf.com, where I can help you one-on-one to improve at your game.