Milo Lines Blog

How To Play Golf During A Swing Change | Practice Process And Scoring

Transcription

Milo Lines:
… everybody. Milo here, and I’ve got a special guest. My man, Ed Lasater.

Ed Lasater:
Hi.

Milo Lines:
And Ed is a team member of milolinesgolf.com.

Ed Lasater:
Yes, I am.

Milo Lines:
So he’s part of the crew.

Ed Lasater:
And very excited to be so.

Milo Lines:
Awesome. And today we have a really cool video for you. What are we talking about today, Ed?

Ed Lasater:
How to make a change and how you take a change, if you can do it, from the range to the course in a competition.

Milo Lines:
So let’s say I’m a player, and I’ve been searching YouTube, and I’ve decided I want to make a change. I want to make my golf swing better. What do we generally see from most people? What’s their process look like to make a change?

Ed Lasater:
Well, I think everybody sees something on YouTube, and they think they’re real excited about it. And they go, “Oh, I want to try this. And I want to try that.” And they never really had someone or honestly assess themselves physically if they’re able to do it.

Ed Lasater:
So I would say that there’s four levels of change. One is, can you physically make the change? Sometimes people have bad hips and shoulders and wrists and leg issues and whatnot, mobility issues. And they simply can’t make that change they’re looking for. But let’s say that they can. Well, can they then repeat that change on the range? Generally in a slow fashion to begin with. And then over time, as you build confidence in what you’re doing, it gets faster and faster.

Ed Lasater:
Then can you take it to the golf course in a casual round by yourself or with your buddies? And then can you do in a competition in a skins game, in a club championship and things of that nature?

Milo Lines:
So that’s the four steps of learning. What do we typically see from the average guy, when they go to try to make a change? I don’t see them follow those steps. What I see them do is they come over here, they hit some shots on the range, and they immediately take it out to game day with their … And they play their $5 Nassau or whatever. They hit one bad shot. And they say, “The hell with this.”

Ed Lasater:
Exactly.

Milo Lines:
Didn’t work.

Ed Lasater:
“Scratch it. That guy doesn’t know what he’s talking about. And I’m going to do what I’ve always done.” And they’re right back where they were to begin with.

Milo Lines:
Yeah, exactly.

Ed Lasater:
Because they didn’t stick to the process.

Milo Lines:
So change, does it happen like that?

Ed Lasater:
No, sir. It does not. And the reality is, is that yes, you are changing a motor pattern, but what you’re really changing is your brain. Because the muscles don’t have memory, your brain does. So to change that, it takes time, and it takes effort. And it takes a while for your brain to build confidence in this new pattern that you’re trying to build to then execute it, when now you have a cost to it. I mean, out here on the range, you can blow it 100 yards left to right. It’s irrelevant. But on the golf course, you’ve got your $4 premium golf ball. There’s bunkers, and water, and somebody’s backyard, where they’re barbecuing, and embarrassment in front of your friends. Add all that together with something you’re not confident with, a lot of times it’s the recipe for disaster.

Milo Lines:
Yeah. And it’s usually, you end up going right back to where you’re comfortable.

Ed Lasater:
100%.

Milo Lines:
Because a lot of times, the change we’re making, it requires your ability to commit. You have to be able to … Sometimes it might even be you’re lining up different. You’re seeing the target in a totally different way.

Ed Lasater:
100%.

Milo Lines:
Everything looks different. And then you’re out there on the golf course. And it’s like, “Oh, I’m not used to aiming this way.” Everything looks weird, and you hit a foul ball. It happens.

Ed Lasater:
It’s like trying to tell a major league player, “Hey, you’re throwing a curve ball wrong.” And you retrain him, and the first one goes 450 feet into the stands. That’s the last time he’s going to do what you say. [inaudible 00:03:39] the last time. He’ll do what he’s always done, because that’s what he’s comfortable with.

Milo Lines:
Yeah, exactly. So let’s walk through. Right now, I’m going to play a student, who’s making a change. Let’s say I’m a student who maybe I’m a little arms-y, and I’m backing out of the golf shot. My levers are unloading. Is it the chicken or the egg that’s causing me to unload my levers? Is it me backing up? Or is it just, am I backing up, because I’m unloading my levers? I don’t know, but we got to make a change.

Ed Lasater:
We have to make a change. We know that. And we don’t know what causes which. Right? Again, is it the chicken or the egg? We are not 100% sure. What we do know that we have to get you in a position where that video in your brain has to get reprogrammed to what’s comfortable to you.

Ed Lasater:
And right now, if you have a guy who, let’s say that they don’t early extend per se, but they back away to extend their arm.

Milo Lines:
So they’re going-

Ed Lasater:
They stay down-

Milo Lines:
… this way.

Ed Lasater:
… but they do that. Well, a lot of times for those players, you would say, “Okay, well, then keep your right arm a little more bent. Keep your right wrist a little more extended.”

Ed Lasater:
Well, okay. They may do that. But chances are, that’s not what they’re comfortable with. They’re comfortable seeing their head back away.

Milo Lines:
If they’re comfortable with this moving this way-

Ed Lasater:
Exactly.

Milo Lines:
… they’re going to keep doing this to make contact.

Ed Lasater:
So often, I’ll have them, when they’re standing at a dress … Can you stand over [inaudible 00:05:01] the ball?

Milo Lines:
Yep.

Ed Lasater:
I’ll have them put pressure on my hand and leave pressure there. Now, just give me waist high to waist high.

Ed Lasater:
And I don’t care about the results. It’s irrelevant how it goes. I don’t care how you hit it. That’s not the point. The point of this is to reprogram your brain, to feel comfortable, staying in the shot all the way around the corner. And it takes time. It doesn’t happen overnight, and it doesn’t [inaudible 00:05:30] even one shot. It won’t even take one bucket. It may take more time. It may take drills that you have to do at home, whether it’s doing the airplane drill at home, or you’re putting your head on a wall or whatever it is you got to do. But it takes time. And you will feel uncomfortable. And chances are, if you’re uncomfortable, you’re a lot closer to where you want to be than where you were.

Milo Lines:
And I guarantee you, you will not be able to add speed right away. Because when you go fast, it triggers the natural motion that’s built in. It’s like a computer program, it’s written. And it wants to show up. And so, the minute you add speed, you show back up. I don’t care who you are, you’re back. So you’ve got to override it.

Ed Lasater:
100%.

Milo Lines:
You have to go slow for quite a while.

Ed Lasater:
You do.

Milo Lines:
And so, you’re going to really feel exaggerated. Everything you do is going to be the opposite. So if I’m used to going this way, now, I’m going to feel like I’m staying … My head’s staying out, and I’m going to even feel like my head is working down and staying out. Because of that, I’m going to feel like my arms are staying … This arm’s going to feel like it’s maintaining its bend, and this wrist is going to maintain its bend a lot longer. And I’m going to stay like that. Now I know my head didn’t go this way.

Ed Lasater:
No way. It didn’t. You wouldn’t let it. No way.

Milo Lines:
And so, for someone who’s making that change, that is going to be so uncomfortable.

Ed Lasater:
100%. They’re going to feel like they’re crowding the ball, that they’re going to fall in their face and whatnot. And we’ll get into other videos as to why and how your pressure changes and how it allow you to do this more comfortably. But in this particular case about making the change particularly, is you have to go through this process of reprogramming what you feel comfortable doing.

Milo Lines:
Okay. So let’s walk through this again. Phase number one is to assess your ability to even do it.

Ed Lasater:
You have to even make the change, physically.

Milo Lines:
If you physically can’t do it in slow motion, you can’t do it.

Ed Lasater:
No, you can’t.

Milo Lines:
So that’s number one. We’ve got to assess our ability to do it. Now, if we still want to do it, then maybe we need to go do some mobility exercises off the golf course, and find a way to get our body better.

Ed Lasater:
Yes.

Milo Lines:
So we can-

Ed Lasater:
[crosstalk 00:07:44] professional. Yeah.

Milo Lines:
But if we can do it slow, so if I know I can … Okay, I can make this happen slow. Well, now I know I’m capable of it, at least. So now I’m going to start doing it slow and applying it to the ball, gradually figure out how to add some speed to it, make it hold together on the driving range. And then I’m going to take it out.

Milo Lines:
My preference would be go out by yourself, when you’re making a change. So you don’t have any pressure on you. It’s not going to embarrass you, if you hit it squirrel-y. Who cares? Get some confidence in your ability to transfer it out there before you put pressure on it.

Milo Lines:
Because if we put pressure on it too soon, it’s going to blow up on you. And you’re going to probably walk away and not continue with the change, even though-

Ed Lasater:
100%.

Milo Lines:
… it might be beneficial.

Ed Lasater:
That’s right. And also, when you’re on the range and you’re making this change, I know it stinks, but try to video yourself about every fifth wing. And the only reason is, is it’s confirmation bias.

Ed Lasater:
You may think you’re doing it, and you may start what you think is reprogramming that brain to what you see. But if you’re not seeing it, you’re not videoing it, and you’re not confirming, “I’m doing what I think I’m doing,” then you’re just making bad habits.

Milo Lines:
Because not everybody-

Ed Lasater:
Let’s-

Milo Lines:
… can have-

Ed Lasater:
… change your habits.

Milo Lines:
… you and me standing right there telling them, “Yep-

Ed Lasater:
Exactly.

Milo Lines:
… you did it right.” Or, “No, you didn’t.”

Ed Lasater:
Exactly.

Milo Lines:
So you’ve got to-

Ed Lasater:
Exactly.

Milo Lines:
… know what you’re looking for, have a really good plan and then have some feedback. Because with no feedback, it’s not going to work. So you might even build a station that’s Ed, with his hand on you. And so, you figure out how to … You create something, maybe-

Ed Lasater:
A swim noodle.

Milo Lines:
A [crosstalk 00:09:22]-

Ed Lasater:
Stick it in your bag, and have the swim noodle come out and barely touch a brim of your hat. And then make sure that you always keep contact with that thing all the way around the corner. So maybe-

Milo Lines:
So build a station, and then gradually get away from the station, because you don’t want to have that as a crutch. But you have to have some feedback there first. I totally agree. Awesome.

Ed Lasater:
Exactly.

Milo Lines:
So that’s the process. I hope this helps. Now, this again, is Ed Lasater. So if anybody wants to get in touch with Ed for lessons … Where do you teach, Ed?

Ed Lasater:
I’m down in Chula Vista, California.

Milo Lines:
Chula Vista. How would people go about reaching out to you?

Ed Lasater:
I’m on Instagram @edlasatergolf, and there’s a book now button on my profile page.

Milo Lines:
I think you’re also on milolinesgolf.com. So if you go to milolinesgolf.com and click schedule a lesson-

Ed Lasater:
That’s right.

Milo Lines:
… Ed’s profile shows up on my website as well.

Ed Lasater:
That’s right. Sure does.

Milo Lines:
So thanks again, Ed.

Ed Lasater:
Thank you.

Milo Lines:
Hope you all enjoyed this. We’d love to have you as members of milolinesgolf.com. Come visit us there, and we’ll help you learn how to swing like an athlete.